Miklos, Andrew


Andrew Miklos, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow
Dr. Huan-Xiang Zhou’s Group
Office – KLB 407
Lab – KLB 219
Email – amiklos@fsu.edu

RESEARCH INTERESTS

The majority of proteins function in a cellular environment teeming with macromolecules. Most studies of protein properties, however, are conducted in dilute solution. My research aims to bridge the gap between dilute solution studies and in-cell conditions by investigating the role of macromolecular crowding in modulating protein properties. I am currently studying the crowding effect on protein ligand binding affinities using a combination of NMR, fluorescence, and AUC techniques.

I am also interested in the properties of intrinsically disordered proteins, and how to characterize transiently populated structural ensembles that may play an important role in their functions.

EDUCATION

2006-2011 – Ph. D. – University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill – Chemistry
2002-2006 – A.B. – Brown University – Chemistry and Mathematics

PUBLICATIONS

  • Miklos AC, Li C, Sorrell CD, Lyon LA, Pielak GJ. “An Upper Limit for Macromolecular Crowding Effects.” BMC Biophys. 4:13 termi(2011)
  • Miklos AC, Sarkar M, Wang Y, Pielak GJ. Protein Crowding Tunes Protein Stability. JACS. 133: 7116-7120 (2011)
  • Pielak GJ and Miklos AC. “Crowding and Function Reunite.” PNAS. 107: 17457-17458 (2010) (Commentary)
  • Miklos AC, Li C, Sharaf NG, Pielak GJ. “Volume Exclusion and Soft Interaction Effects on Protein Stability in Crowded Conditions.” Biochemistry. 49: 6984-6991 (2010)
  • Miklos AC, Li C, Pielak GJ. “Using NMR-Detected Backbone Amide 1H Exchange to Assess Macromolecular Crowding Effects on Globular-Protein Stability.” Methods Enzymol. 466:1-18. (2009)
  • Pielak GJ, Li C, Miklos AC, Schlesinger AP, Slade KM, Wang GF, Zigoneanu IG. “Protein Nuclear Magnetic Resonance under Physiological Conditions.” Biochemistry. 48:226-34 (2009) (Current Topics)


PRESENTATIONS

  • Telluride Science Research Center, Macromolecular Crowding, June 23, 2011 “Crowding Effects on Biopolymers: Toward Biological Conditions”
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Thesis Defense, November 2, 2010 “Macromolecular Crowding Effects on Globular Protein Stability”
  • Michigan State University, Chemistry Department, September 30, 2010 “Synthetic Polymer and Protein Crowding Effects on Folding Stability”
  • Florida State University, Institute of Molecular Biophysics, September 7, 2010 “Synthetic Polymer and Protein Crowding Effects on Folding Stability”
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chemistry Dept., March 15, 2010 “Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Stability”
  • Telluride Science Research Center, Macromolecular Crowding, July 8, 2009 “Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Protein Stability and Dynamics”

AWARDS

NIH – Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award – 2012
Telluride Research Science Center – Peter Salamon Award for Young Scientists – 2011
UNC Chapel Hill Chemistry Department –Teaching Assistant Award – 2007